Mirrored image of the Centennial Bridge

Mirrored image of the Centennial Bridge
One frosty and very still morning in November, 2010, Centennial Bridge, Miramichi, NB, Canada

About Me

My Photo
Miramichi, NB, Canada
Spiritual,fun loving,hard working

Followers

Moon Rising Over Neguac Beach, NB, Canada

Moon Rising Over Neguac Beach, NB, Canada
Moon Rising Over Neguac Beach, Neguac, New Brunswick, Canada

Saturday, March 1, 2014

Duty Watch, SepiaSaturday, March 1, 2014

As I saw a telescope in the prompt for this week, I came across this photo of a soldier with an odd telescope at shorpy.com.  I don't believe I have ever seen anything like it.  Does anyone have any idea if there were many of those telescopes around or did it just pertain to Germany.  This photo was found in Germany in 1972.
www.shorpy.com/node/16741

Then I went looking among my pictures to see if I had any cliffs as the men in the prompt are on a cliff.  I took this picture of a cliff in the north eastern tip of Prince Edward Island, just 3-4 hour drive from home.  My eldest son, David, and I were having a day trip.  Now, I see a man's face in this cliff, the grass on top as the tuft of hair, the long forehead and heavy set eyebrow, down to his nose and mouth.  Maybe, it is just my imagination.....


Here is another picture I took at the same time.  Prince Edward Island is home to the famed "Anne of Green Cables".  As you can see, they have red soil over there.

For other "cliff hangers", go to www.sepiasaturday.blogspot.com

17 comments:

  1. Your last photos are very beautiful! It's an amazing telescope, or whatever the term may be in that case, which the thing appears to have dual purposes for viewing!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I would call the thing in your first photo, telescope binoculars, but I'm sure that's not its official name. And yes, I can see the face you describe in that second photo of the cliff - kind of reminiscent of the statue faces on Easter Island - which have recently been discovered to be complete statues buried, in part, by the shifting 'sands' of time. The soil of Prince Edward Island probably has a lot of iron in it. When we lived in Gasquet in N. CA, the soil was very red b/c of the iron content & was heck to wash out of clothes it got on! BTW, I've been meaning to tell you I really like the peasant blouse & turquoise jewelry you're wearing in your opening photograph. Both are among my favorite things. :))

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, the soil is difficult to wash out off clothes!!! Thank you for the compliment of the top and jewellery. I love turquoise colors, the blouse I sewed up last summer.

      Delete
  3. Part telescope / Part periscope! Evidently very powerful binoculars.

    Prince Edward Island is on my list of Must-Visits. There's a lot of red clay in Virginia, in particular the Shenandoah Valley and Southwest Virginia.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It will be worth your while to go visit Prince Edward Island, bring a sweater with you, it is always windy on the island.

      Delete
  4. Wow, what amazing periscope binoculars - a clever invention.
    And, yes, I can see the face too.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I think those periscopes were used frequently during the Great War, so that soldiers could observe the enemy activities from the safety of their own trenches without being observed or hit by a sniper's bullet. Great photo of a much later version - the double lenses clearly designed for stereoscipic or 3-d views.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Brett's explanation makes sense. It is probably just being demonstrated in the photo.

    ReplyDelete
  7. A fascinating telescope - my husband (ex physics teacher) too thinks it is a binocular-telescope, used in the First World War to look over the top of trenches. The last photograph of the sea and red cliffs is stunning.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Brett has it right but I think these are special stereoscopic rangefinder scopes that were used by artillery observers. This soldier would report back on the accuracy of shellfire. I think the soldier's uniform is German from WW2.

    ReplyDelete
  9. That just reminds us that telescopes/binoculars can be used in warfare too. The face in the rock really stands out.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I was glad to hear the comments about that binocular-scope, raised with tubes on a tripod too...sort of like a periscope...and you are right, that face on the cliff is just waiting to lap up waves.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Well, I'm glad other sees that face too!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Easter Island came to mind when I saw the face too (though I have to admit it didn’t immediately jump out at me; it’s just a matter of perception). That’s a really interesting photo of the telescopic binoculars.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Yep, I was going to say that I imagine that kind of telescope was for use in the trenches too. I'm always seeing faces in everything. Why is it so????

    ReplyDelete
  14. That is really an odd telescope. Wonder if it might be for some sort of surveying work? And I too can see the man's profile in the cliff.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hello Rose
    Thank you for your lovely comments about One's tea cosies. What a beautiful story about taking tea with your mum. I worked on an art/social history project with a photographer friend to gather portraits and stories of tea cosy 'guardians'. Your story fits well. Have a look at www.portraitsofateacosy.com . You have a lovely blog here. Especially love your namesake flower surround. the best. Loani

    ReplyDelete