Mirrored image of the Centennial Bridge

Mirrored image of the Centennial Bridge
One frosty and very still morning in November, 2010, Centennial Bridge, Miramichi, NB, Canada

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Miramichi, NB, Canada
Spiritual,fun loving,hard working

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McKinleyville, New Brunswick, Canada

McKinleyville, New Brunswick, Canada
An old shed with daisies

Thursday, March 3, 2011

For Sepia Saturday March 5

Wash day must have been time consuming back then.  I still appreciate my washer/dryer!!!!

14 comments:

  1. Hello Rosie!
    Imagine meeting another Theriault through Sepia Saturday! I wonder if you are also descended through the Caraquet Theriaults?
    I love this catalogue page - and in fact I use these a lot with my Grade 5/6 students to show them what life was like in the "olden" days. In fact, when I was growing up in the mid 50s, my mother had this type of wringer washer. It fascinated - but also frightened me - because I always imagined getting my fingers stuck in the wringer! My mother was so happy a few years later when she got a modern-type washer AND a dryer - luxury of luxuries!
    Evelyn Yvonne Theriault
    A Canadian Family

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  2. Well now Evelyn, I originally come from St. Isidore, NB. My Thériault roots are from Haut Bertrand. Who knows, we could be related.......

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  3. It is always interesting to see old products like this washing machine which was something we didn't possess during WWII. My mother had to boil all our clothes in a copper fuelled by coal. The wringer or mangle stood nearly 5ft tall. I had the job of turning the handle when I was big enough.

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  4. Hi Rosie,
    I was surprised by the last name too. At first I thought this was Evelyn's new blog. (She is ambitious.)
    Anyway, about these washing machines. They must have been considered very expensive at the time. there were probably plenty of women who ended up washing their clothes by hand because they couldn't afford one of these.

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  5. I certainly appreciate my washing machine too. I remember my parents speaking of when they had three children very close together and all of the nappy washing etc and that they couldn't afford a washing machine!

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  6. Sadly I do remember washers like this. I can remember my grandmother putting things through the wringer. Actually I also remember my mother doing it. I had a toy washing machine that had a wringer.

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  7. Oh me too! I've even used one of those washers before, really! My mother in law had one still for many years after I married her son....you sure appreciated washing your clothes, but my most fond memory wash smelling the freshness of the bleach and the end rinse!

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  8. My Mom used one of these and she used lye soap which she made herself!

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  9. I'm glad we have automatic washers and dryers now.

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  10. My grandmother had a wringer washer and we drained the water by filling a rubber hose, plugging it with our thumb, then taking it to the sink drain. Washing was done in the basement where there was a drain installed. How I hated being in the basement unless she was there with me. It smelled and the furnace was so scary!

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  11. Interesting post : and interesting comments as I have been wondering whether you and Evelyn were related for ages. As for the wringer washer, I remember them well.

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  12. We are not related, (I think), our relatives live just a few kilometers away, one never knows.......

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  13. I read the other day, that Tuesday was the only day that they allowed the electricity to be on in the daytime so everyone had to iron with electric irons on Tuesday. Electricity at first was only on at night.

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